Hear the Sounds of Perseverance Rover Traveling In Space

NASA’s Perseverance Rover is currently going through a deep space on its journey to Mars, where it will arrive in about three months. But if you want to check on the rover, NASA has a new way of doing it for you – you can listen to a clip of audio taken by its onboard microphone as it rotates into space at a speed of 26,000 mph is.

The Fixture is the first rover to be mounted on a microphone, and engineers collected a 60-second audio clip that picked it up on 19 October. You can either listen on SoundCloud or use the link above.

The depiction of persistence follows the path of Mars inside its protective aerosil.
The depiction of persistence follows the path of Mars inside its protective aerosil. NASA / JPL-Caltech

The hissing sound you can hear is the rover’s heat rejection fluid pump, which maintains the rover’s temperature by passing the fluid through a heat exchanger. Although the sound cannot travel in the vacuum of space, mechanical vibrations can be transferred through the solid body of the rover and picked up as an electrical signal.

The microphone is included as an experimental effort to capture the audio of the entry, descending and landing (EDL) sequence when the rover approaches Mars.

“As great as it is to take a little audio on the operation of the spacecraft in flight, the sound file has a more important meaning,” Dave Gruel, one for the Mars 2020 EDL camera and microphone subsystem The chief engineer said in the statement. “This means that our system is ready to try to record the sound and fury of the landing on Mars.”

In this annotated illustration, the location of the entry, descent and landing microphone of the Perseverance Rover is shown.
In this annotated illustration, the location of the entry, descent and landing microphone of the Perseverance Rover is shown. NASA / JPL-Caltech

Since this is the first time a microphone has been included on a rover (although Mars sounds have not been recorded for the first time), engineers are unsure whether or not the landing sequence is. . But they are expecting the best.

“Getting the sound off the landing is a good-to-have thing, not a necessity,” Gruel said. “If it doesn’t, it won’t interrupt the Rover’s mission of search in the Jezero Crater one bit. If a portion of the landing sequence is captured on audio, that would be great.”

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