The automaker and startup are considering how to reuse the battery before it is sent for recycling.

Electric car and Trucks feel like they have everything going for them: they don’t produce tailpipe emissions, they are quieter than their fossil-fuel-powered counterparts and the built-in architecture allows for roomier and often sleeker designs. But the humble lithium-ion batteries that power these cars and trucks lead a hard life. These batteries deteriorate over the first five to eight years of use due to irregular charging and discharge rates, rapid temperatures, and multiple partial charge cycles, and ultimately, they end up in a recycling facility.

Instead of sending batteries directly for recycling for raw material recovery – and leaving unrealistic value on the table – startups and automakers are finding ways to reuse batteries as part of a smaller and growing market.

Low consumer lift and relatively recent supply of used batteries to market EVs have been low, but automakers are already pursuing several other life projects.

This is because the average electric vehicle can retain up to 70% of its charging capacity after the lithium ion battery is removed. The commercial offer for second-life batteries is therefore intuitive: before sending the battery to the recycler, automakers can potentially generate additional revenue by using it in another application or by selling it to a third party.

Low consumer lift and relatively recent supply of used batteries to market EVs have been low, but automakers are already pursuing several other life projects.

To name a few such projects that have popped up in recent years, Nissan is using old batteries to power small robots; French carmaker Groupe Renault, with partners, is introducing a stable energy storage system with outdated EV batteries; Audi Environmental Foundation, the daughter organization of Audi AG, worked with the Indian startup Noonam to manufacture solar nanogrids from the e-tron battery module employed.

Other OEMs, such as Lucid Motors, BMW and Protera, are incorporating the principles of reuse into their battery design. In fact, Lucid has built its batteries to work on its electric vehicle and energy storage products, including second-life uses, chief engineer Eric Bach told ClearTips. BMW spokesman Weild Bruch said in an interview with ClearTips, BMW has used a “plug-and-play” concept with batteries in their i3 models so that they can be easily removed and inserted. “We believe that battery second-life will become its own business area,” he said.

A new strap on battery life

Automakers are increasingly on second-life uses, although the size of their role in this budding market is still unclear. Matthew Lumsden, CEO of UK-based Connected Energy, told ClearTips that he has seen a change in the last two years where some OEMs have started to see batteries as an asset rather than a liability.

By Jothi Venkat

Chief Editor Jothi Venkat Tips Clear In . Editorial chief and CEO of TipsClear.in. Representing many online News sites and Magazines. Having Media company World Wide with a team of Neutral Reporters.

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