Emma Stone Cruella: Origin Story of The World’s Most Glamorous Villain

Photography via Getty Images

This fashion-filled prequel features Emma Stone shaking up an English accent and over-the-top costumes.

Every villain needs a captivating origin story – and Disney’s Cruella Bold is dripping with fashion, makeup and hair look that perfectly suits the world’s most glamorous on-screen criminal. Inspired by Glenn Close’s sinister freak Cruella de Vil in the 1979 film 101 Dalmation, Cruella Gives us a glimpse into the character’s early life and follows the events that led to his development in the Cruella de Vil we all now know.

The film premiered in Los Angeles last week, and although it will not be officially released until May 28, there is no shortage of fashion and plot details to catch your attention ahead of time. Everything you need to know about Craig Gillespie is here Cruella.

What a conspiracy CruellaThe

Oscar-winning actor Emma Stone is in an English accent as Estella, a young designer who hopes to make it big in the fashion world amid the London punk-rock revolution of the 1970s. She is hired by industry veteran Baroness von Hellman (Emma Thompson), and from here, we see the transformation of Estella’s infamous Cruella de Vil.

The film strategically uses Cruella’s fashion statement to represent her new, increasingly nonconformist identity.

“In this film, we get to see how she became the villain we know today,” Stone said in the film’s promotional video. “Once you wear this wild black and white hair, this incredible makeup, and these completely unique costumes, you feel like Cruella de Vil.”

Where did the inspiration come from CruellaFrom whom does fashion and beauty come?

Cruella The entire film has an astonishing 47 looks, many of which were sourced from old stores in New York, Los Angeles and London. Keeping in mind the setting of the film’s punk-rock backdrop, Cruella’s forms were heavily influenced by Gunda. Costume designer Jenny Bevan said references were extensive, including Vivienne Westwood, Alexander McQueen, German singer Nina Hagen and 1980s British fashion label Bodymap.

Hair and makeup designer Nadia Stacey told the trend That it was “no hindrance” when it came to brainstorming for many of the film’s looks. Inspiration came from all different time periods; He studied references to 18th-century makeup and wigs, 1950s and 1960s looks, avant-garde hair sculptures and, of course, 1970s punk.

Cruella’s signature black and white hair is arguably her most recognizable feature. The film presents Cruella’s hair in an interesting way, masking it at first. When we meet Estella, she sports a grown-up shag disguised her natural two-toned hair and dyed red to conform to social standards of beauty. Stacey said that this hairdo was meant to represent someone who grew up in London in the 1970s. As the story progresses and Estella changes, she gives up the hair dye and lets her natural black and white hair shine.

The hair and makeup changes in this film are indicative of Estella’s development as a character. When we first meet her, she dyes her hair red with the fear that her natural hair will be considered strange or unattractive. As she moves back and forth from the status quo, we see that she is actively adopting a new, individualistic identity.

How is Emma Stone’s Cruella different from Glen Close’s Cruella? 101 DalmationThe

Stacey said that she wanted to honor Klose’s look, and to pay tribute to it, especially in Stone’s first appearance as Cruella de Vil. When we first see Stone as a fully formed Cruella, her hair and nails are styled in the same manner as Klose wore in the role’s adaptation. But since this is an origin story, Stone’s Cruella recognizes it genre-wise, and ultimately differs from the Cruella we see 101 Dalmation.

Despite the film’s distinction from 1996’s Cruella de Vil, Close is the executive producer Cruella, Which tells us that there will be some influence and inspiration from the original film.

What fashion moments are we looking forward to seeing? CruellaThe

Cruella’s signature colors are black, white, gray, and red (for moments of special significance). The film will undoubtedly be full of fashion, but here are three of our favorite looks so far.

Laurie Sparham. photography by

Cruella has a show-stopping moment in this red dress. She enters a black and white ball inspired by Marie Antoinette in a mysterious white cloak. She then sets the cloak on fire to show a red ballgown inspired by Charles James’s “Tree” dress kept at the Metropolitan Museum. At this time, her red dress is in stark contrast to the rest of the black and white outfits in the room, representing Cruella as the ultimate outsider.

Photography via Getty Images

In this scene, Cruella stands on top of the car wearing a long scarlet skirt and a custom-made jacket with miniature horses and carts on her shoulders. Her skirt, made by costume designer Kirsten Fletcher, is so long that it wraps around the car she is standing on.

Photography via Getty Images

The film’s punk effect comes in an iconic form where “The Future” is written in black makeup on Cruella’s pale face, almost as if she is wearing a black mask. For this look, Stacey copied the font used on the 1977 album cover of Sex Pistol Never mind the bolock.

When the film releases on May 28, we can’t wait to get to know Stone’s Cruella de Vil better.

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